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About Tlaquepaque
Over a hundred years ago, wealthy families from nearby Guadalajara began building summer homes in Tlaquepaque, attracted by its clean air, tranquility, and rustic charm.
Soon Tlaquepaque was attracting talented artists from elsewhere in the state of Jalisco and from all over Mexico, and it established a reputation for the quality and diversity of its wares. Today a number of old summer homes have been converted into shops with Mexican crafts from near and far and restaurants that serve fine international cuisine.

Tlaquepaque is now part of the of metropolitan Guadalajara, but it continues to feel like a small town.
Jardin Hidalgo
Casa Fuerte Visitors from all over the world are drawn to Tlaquepaque by its colorful architecture, friendly people, and great shopping.

Avenida Independencia, a street closed to vehicular traffic, is the perfect place to begin your visit. There you’ll find silver from Taxco, rugs from Oaxaca, Huichol clothing from Nayarit, and pottery from the states of Guanajuato and Jalisco, as well as locally made iron work and hand painted tiles.
Fountain on Independencia The fine arts are also found in Tlaquepaque. For example, Sergio Bustamante grew up here and has maintained the Family Workshop Studio in Tlaquepaque since 1975, working in media as diverse as painting and sculpture, paper maché, ceramics, and jewelry.

Another local specialty is hand-blown glass. At La Rosa de Cristal you can watch boys as young as twelve carrying spheres of molten glass on long metal poles, blowing, twirling, shaping, and, finally, cutting off a vase, wine glass, or pitcher. In the gift shop you can purchase even more items, including jewelry boxes and small, delicate figurines.
El Patio
There are two well-known ceramics shops that should not be missed. The first is El Palomar. Located on the way into Tlaquepaque, it offers a wide variety of dishes, mugs, decorative pieces, and more. The other is Paco Padilla.

Although they both produce hand-painted, lead-free ceramics, there is a definite difference in styles, and you should consider visiting both before making any large purchases. Also, be aware that both shops have "seconds" areas. The pieces there always have flaws, but some are so unnoticeable that you'll wonder how the work ended up there.
La Casa Vieja
Mariachis in the Parian Despite the fine craftsmanship, foreign visitors will be surprised as at reasonable cost of the arts and crafts sold in Tlaquepaque. Whether you have a few dollars or a few thousand dollars to spend, you’ll find endless treasures to bring home with you.
When lunch-time comes, you will find a variety of restaurants to choose from. Some of the most famous are El Patio and La Casa Vieja; and for dinner, be sure to try La Unica, right beside Olivia’s Apartments, where a waiter will arrive at your table with a big smile. Cafe de olla, a typical Mexican style coffee made with cinnamon and raw sugar, will help your food digest and prepare you for your next exciting day in Tlaquepaque.
By the end of the day, when the sun is beginning to set, wander over to El Parián, find a table, order a margarita, and enjoy the mariachi music. For just a few pesos, you can have some of Jalisco's finest mariachi musicians play you a song to accompany the day's joys and triumphs.
Yellow flower
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